Engage micro grants programme

Engage represents gallery and visual art education professionals throughout the UK. We support arts educators, organisations, freelancers and artists to work together with communities in dynamic, open exchanges that give everyone the opportunity to learn and benefit from the arts.

Call for Proposals: Engage Journal 45 - Class and inequality

Proposals are invited for issue 45 of the Engage Journal: Class and Inequality. This issue will focus on issues of class, socio-economic disadvantage and inequality in relation to gallery education and engagement programmes and the related sector.

Edited by Professor Sarah Perks.

Deadline for proposals: 11 January 2021

If you are interested in contributing to this issue, please send an informal proposal of around 200-300 words, your job/freelance title and contact details to editor@engage.org by Monday, 5pm, 11 January 2021.

 

Engage Trustee vacancies. We require trustees with expertise in: Legal, Digital and Visual Arts and Gallery Education in Wales

Engage, the National Association for Gallery Education, is seeking new trustees to join our established and dedicated Board in November 2020. The Board, which currently has 14 members, meets quarterly.

We are particularly interested in applications from those who individually have knowledge and expertise in the three following areas: The law, digital, and of visual arts education and gallery education in Wales.

 

The role of the Engage Board is to:

Biggerhouse Films present 'Different Voices'

Watch films and take part in a discussion about the next step for Neurodiverse filmmaking.

“…… neurodivergent – i.e. being dyslexic, dyspraxic, autistic, or having other learning difficulties or neurological/cognitive conditions, or experiencing yourself as someone whose way of relating to the world and other people is outside of the norm.” 
Dr. Daniel Oliver

Come the Revolution Present: (Wo)man In Me

Join us for an immersive film essay curated collectively by Come the Revolution, followed by an in-conversation between members of the group.

Societal constructions of Black women, reflected in cinematic culture, present us with hyper notions of gender identity, from the mama figure of Oprah Winfrey, to the supposed 'masculinity' of Serena Williams.

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